Hammy the Hammer

From SolSeed

Jump to: navigation, search

Hammy the Hammer is the title character of a children's play written by Eric Saumur. The play is about a young hammer questioning the purpose that has been given to him by those around him.

Hammy the Hammer and His Search for Purpose

Narrator: Hammy the Hammer was a young hammer who always felt like he was different from his friends at school. His friends all loved driving nails into wood and would hammer nails from the moment they got to school until it was time to go home. Hammy could hear both the nails and the wood complain as he hit them and he felt sorry for them.

Hammy the Hammer hits his head against a nail.

Nail: Ouch! That hurt. Hey now I am stuck in this wood! I'll never get free. Help! Help! I'm trapped!

400px

Wood: Oh the inhumanity! To have a sharp spike of steel driven into my side. Ohhhh!

Hammy: I'm sorry Nail. I'm sorry wood. I am a hammer. It's what I am meant to do. It's my use, my role to play, my thing to do.

Nail: Well I don't like it.

Wood: It's immoral as far as I'm concerned.

Narrator: Hammy went to his teacher and asked:

Hammy: Why do we hit nails all day? Is it really a good thing to do? Wood says it's immoral and Nail says she doesn't like it.

Teacher: You are a hammer. As I have said many times, hitting nails is what you are meant to do. It is your use, your role to play, your thing to do.

Narrator: So Hammy went back to his work bench and continued hammering nails for the rest of the day. But as he walked home he once again questioned whether hammering nails was the right thing for him to be doing. He looked at the flower gardens and he felt drawn to them. He knew in his heart that flower gardens was where he belonged. He didn't want to make nails and wood suffer all day. So when he turned to the sky and asked,

Hammy: Why do we hit nails all day? Is it really a good thing to do? Wood says it's immoral and Nail says she doesn't like it.

Sky: This is a story and I am just a personification of the sky. The sky doesn't think or speak. Don't waste your time asking the sky what to do.

Narrator: Hammy wasn't happy with this answer so he went to the shop of the craftsman who made hammers and asked.

Hammy: Why do we hit nails all day? Is it really a good thing to do? Wood says it's immoral and Nail says she doesn't like it.

Craftsman: I created you to hit nails. Hitting nails is what you are meant to do. It is your use, your role to play, your thing to do.

Narrator: Hammy was saddened by these answers. He didn't want to hit nails anymore. He went and sat on a park bench and cried.

Hammy: Boo Hoo! I don't want to hit nails anymore

Narrator: Just then Amy the Anarchist came along.

Amy: Then don't hit nails.

Hammy: What? You mean just don't do it?

Amy: Yes. You are an individual, you can do what ever you want.

Hammy: But teacher says its what I am meant to do.

Amy: Maybe it's what she means for you to do but it doesn't have to be what you mean for yourself to do.

Hammy: But my creator says he made me and he says it's my use, my role to play, my thing to do.

Amy: Just because he created you doesn't mean he gets to decide what you want to do. You have freewill. Freewill has a use, a role to play, a thing to do. Freewill's thing to do, is what ever you want.

Hammy: Yay! Freewill!

Narrator: So Hammy the Hammer became the first hammer ever to graduate from the Osaka School of Japanese Flower Arrangement. The end.

Critical Reception

After the play was performed at Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship of Ottawa, we received quite a bit of positive feedback. In fact, Calogero Cumbo, a friend of the UUFO wrote:

Eric,

I was just thinking back to the play you had performed for your talk. I really liked your twist on "purpose" (teleology). Even though the "purpose" of the hammer was to nail nails into wood, it could choose to do otherwise.

The Teleological proof of God's existence, argued that since everything has a purpose then there must be a purpose for everything, and that purpose is God. The fallacy in that proof is that purpose is a human construct. It's true that a tool maker has a purpose in making a hammer, but it's a pure assumption to extrapilate that people have a purpose, and that hence there must be a purpose maker, i.e. God. Jean Paul Sartre argued that there is no purpose in human life other than that which we as people give it, thus turning the Teleological argument on its head.

But I found the way you dealt with the Teleological argument quite refreshing: rather than argue against people having a purpose, you proposed that people can do what they want regardless of the purpose their "maker" had for them. Nice.

-- Ciao, Calogero

Personal tools